7 Books Worth Your Time in 2018

I've mentioned that my word for this year is TIME. My kids are getting older, and The Captain and I are riper by the day. I feel hyper aware of the changing nature of seasons in our lifetime, and it seems as though we are shifting into a new one very quickly. 

I've read some of your suggestions for strategic options in managing time creatively and wisely (thanks for those!). A common theme has been trimming out some of the time-wasters in life. Facebook, am I right? 

The one thing you'll never hear any person say when they're old and gray is..."I wish I had read fewer books." Reading is so good for the soul, even for all you non-introverts. Books can help you escape if you're stressed, they can make you think if you like to think, they can entertain if you're bored, and they always make you at least a little bit smarter. One of the worst things about Facebook is that everywhere you click, people are just hurting each other. It's not all evil, of course, but we can all agree that there's so much arguing and insulting and all the yucky things on Facebook that this life is just not supposed to be about.

Even when people don't mean to be cruel, sometimes all the sharing and commenting and "liking" can be really hurtful to other people who are silently witnessing their friends' or family's behavior online. There's just so much offense happening out there on the social media.

Unlike reading, I've heard hundreds of people say they wish they spent less time on Facebook. 

 Photo by  Andre Hunter  on  Unsplash

Photo by Andre Hunter on Unsplash

If you're like me and aiming to make better use of your time in 2018, try replacing some of that mindless Facebook scrolling with a book. Less Facebook, more actual book book. Seems easy enough, right? 

Here are seven books worth your time in 2018: 

Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult

Just Mercy by Bryan Stephenson 

The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas 

The Hate U Give
By Angie Thomas

Paper Butterflies by Lisa Heathfield 

Paper Butterflies
By Lisa Heathfield

The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked by Adam Alter

Seven Women: And the Secret of Their Greatness by Eric Metaxas 

The Glass Cage

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I'm over a year into my work toward a PhD and one of my favorite classes so far has been one that focused on the blend of two of my favorite academic-y things: books and technology. In this case it was a focus on reading books about technology, an area in which my curiosity is completely insatiable. Although several of the books I read for this particular class shared a common theme, each served a uniquely individual focus point in the realm of ethics and technology.

The Glass Cage, a very well-written book by Nicholas Carr, first scared the hooey out of me because it includes excruciating details about all the ways automation can fail...starting and ending with the number of plane crashes that have been caused by autopilot. He talks about pilots' loss of life-saving fine motor skills due to automation, and compares that to the evolution of society we see trending as a byproduct of mass outsourcing and automation. It's brilliant, fascinating, terrifying stuff. 

Carr prompts readers to embrace that which makes us uniquely human. He writes that “The trouble with automation is that it often gives us what we don’t need at the cost of what we do” (pg. 14). Of all the sentiments I’ve read and considered about automation specifically as it relates to the impact on humanity, this statement is one of the best that resonates with me. 

As an instructional technology advocate, this book and others like it are a great anchor for reflective - and therefore effective - use of instructional technology. 

Carr, N. (2015). The glass cage: How our computers are changing us, 1st Ed.

Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology

For addicts, managing triggers is an important part of being able to avoid relapse. For technology addicts, however, it can be nearly impossible to manage an unhealthy dependency on technology in the same way as other obsessions. This infographic (an assignment for one of my graduate classes) explains how technology has ushered in an entirely new sort of behavioral addiction.

The real question is...what are we going to do about it? Being addicted to our devices is a common problem in today's information age. Healthy solutions to a growing problem is an important conversation for everyone, but especially for parents and educators. 

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